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Mama indigo in the dark

photo by Saul Escobar

Indigo Children have been compared to the LGBT Community for hiding our true selves from friends, family and society and (sometimes) eventually coming out to reveal who we are. It makes sense. Like the LGBT Community, our lifestyle is ridiculed morally and scientifically creating a danger for those of us who dare to admit we relate to the label Indigo Child. But also like the LGBT Community, we can create a solid foundation on which to grow fulfilling lives by saying the truth about ourselves.

The term ‘coming out’ is a reference to a debutante’s introduction into society. In our current culture, we think of coming out of a closet where we have been isolated and hidden. In reality, the term points to an individual coming out into the world where he or she will join society. A coming out is meant to be an honor and celebrated by the whole community. However, as we have experienced through our LGBT friends, coming out can be tricky when you are unsure if your lifestyle will be supported.

My own coming out as an Indigo Child was rather drawn out and forceful. I denied my true self for about 20 years and instead tried hard to be the kind of person society expected of me. The first person I came out to was myself and it happened through a need for safety. I was so relieved by my revelation that I didn’t consider how my family and friends would react to my news of self-discovery. I definitely fumbled quite a lot and I didn’t come out at work until years later.

I officially joined society as an Indigo Child in October of 2010 when I put my real name on my Facebook profile. It was clear to me that I needed to show my face and state my name if I was actually going to say the truth about myself. I get random messages regularly telling me I’m going to burn in Hell for meditating or listening to my intuition. But I get way more messages thanking me for talking about something that is still below the surface of popular culture.

Through the Indigo Child Interviews, I have tried to create a space where others can be supported in saying their truth and maybe even create a culture of emancipation for Indigo Children as a group. We may not be fighting for the right to marry, but we are fighting for the right to choose what we put in our bodies (like organic produce over psychiatric medications). Our quality of life is being sacrificed for the comfort of those who don’t understand. Only through saying the truth can we show society how to love and nurture us.

4 Things To Do Before Publicly Coming Out as an Indigo Child

indigo woman with curly hair

photo by Saul Escobar

1. Come Out to Yourself
Saying your truth starts by being honest with yourself. Discovering which labels fit you best could take some time. You can always start by acknowledging that you are sensitive or intuitive or conscious.

2. Nurture Yourself
As a sensitive person, it’s essential to learn how to nurture yourself because the world does not currently cater to us. Living a conscious lifestyle is the way you will thrive. Remember, a conscious lifestyle is different for everyone. Find the things that are healthy for your unique body. A great place to start is with your diet.

3. Find Support
Talk with folks who already understand and can offer support. Connect with us through social media. I have met some of my best friends and biggest supporters through the hashtag #indigochildren. Many of us are isolated physically, so social media networks are a great resource. The best support goes both ways. It feels pretty great when your experience becomes valuable to someone else.

4. Educate Yourself
There is an infinite education on the topic of Indigo Children. The more you understand, the more you will be able to explain when you are ready to speak about your truth. Knowledge is power.

After you’ve done those four things, you might be ready to say your truth. Use your intuition to know when it’s the right time to come out and share your truth with friends and family. If you have been nurturing yourself, they will likely have noticed you thriving and be more receptive to why you are making positive changes. If you decide to come out publicly, you may consider these three things when making the big announcement.

Mama Indigo Abby Oliver by Saul Escobar

photo by Saul Escobar

1. Set Them Up For Success
By now, you know who you are and have support. This conversation should be about them. Consider them as an individual and cater the experience so they can understand. Chose a place where they are comfortable, a time that is convenient for them and approach them with plenty of compassionate love. Be available to accept any reaction they may have so they can succeed with you no matter what.

2. Use Words They Can Understand
Indigo Children and other Lightworkers have our own steazy lingo like “open your third eye” or “balance your chakras.” If you choose words the person you’re speaking to would use, they are more likely to understand you. Sometimes when people ask me about Indigo Children they stare at me with a blank face until I give in and use negative words to describe something I see as very positive. It’s our job to show them the positive side of what they understand.

3. Focus on Experiences Rather Than Beliefs
Talk about the positive changes in your life first, and then explain why you have been making these changes. Discuss how you feel rather than what you think. I’ve found people to be resistant to the topic of Indigo Children when they have committed to specific beliefs. I explain I haven’t really thought about what I believe and can only speak about what I’ve experienced. Even if they use scientific arguments to prove I must be wrong, they can’t argue away my experiences.

Ultimately, saying your truth starts by being honest with yourself. That is the truth on which you will build an amazing life. As your friends and family witness you thriving, it will be easier for them to understand your truth. Have compassion for them and find support from others with similar experiences. I did a lot of research on tips for coming out successfully in the LGBT Community and overwhelmingly recommended was baked goods. Organic, gluten-free, naturally sweetened blueberry muffins just might work!